Posture Pro | Posturology Center » Eyes and Posture
The eye is not only an element of vision, it is also (with the foot) one of the most important receptors of the postural system. This has been confirmed by all of the neuroscientific work done in this field. The eye is both an endocaptor and exterocaptor of the system. The eye is the organ that situates us in relationship to the horizon. When muscles that move the eyes are outof balance, our perception of the environment changes, and the entire body attempts to compensate for that phenomenon. In doing so, shifts and rotations of the shoulders and pelvis occur and postural alignment suffers.

Hypoconvergent eye

In order to address this oculomotor asymmetry, a small magnet is applied near the corner of the weaker eye to relax the tendon and help both eyes converge evenly toward the bridge of the nose. Eye exercises are also used to strengthen the weaker eye and further improve eye convergence. The resulting message that is sent to the brain will help keep your head level and your shoulders even.

Clinical signs

  • Cephalalgias
  • Unilateral
  • Hemicranial
  • Temporal
  • Occipital
  • Vertigoes;
  • Feeling of drunkenness;
  • Fear of open spaces (agoraphobia);
  • Travel sickness;
  • Fear of speed;
  • Cervical spine pain;
  • Pain radiating down the arm;
  • Pain in thoracic spine.

“Your posture can be entirely recalibrated… in an hour!”

With children

  • Cephalalgias
  • Unilateral
  • Hemicranial
  • Temporal
  • Occipital
  • Vertigoes;
  • Feeling of drunkenness;
  • Fear of open spaces (agoraphobia);
  • Travel sickness;
  • Fear of speed;
  • Cervical spine pain;
  • Pain radiating down the arm;
  • Pain in thoracic spine.
  • Easily fatigued;
  • Diminished intellectual abilities;
  • Difficulties at school (lazy or turbulent children);
  • Dysgraphia;
  • Spelling difficulties;
  • Difficulties in learning to read;
  • Poor performance in sports activities;
  • Short legs in children.
 

Signs that particularly concern the eyes:

  • Stinging eyes;
  • Burning sensation, weeping, ocular spasms (once infections or other pathologies have been eliminated).
  • A feeling of having sand in the eyes;
  • Blinking or closing one eye especially in bright light;
  • Redness of the eyes;
  • Photophobia associated with weeping;
  • Difficulties when working on a computer or after long periods of data input;
  • Accommodation problems;
  • Difficulties in fixing an object for long periods, falling asleep in front of the T.V., involuntary autohypnosis, a need to close the eyes;
  • Excessive fatigue, blurred vision, even diplopia. Diplopia is the most advanced stage of the disorder that clearly should have been detected earlier.